Plant Profiles - Archive

Hemerocallis

Hemerocallis 'Inca Puzzle'
Ica Puzzle was bred by Petit and registered in 2003. What an amazing and beautiful flower it this has proved to be. It is a really rich purple flower, edged in a creamy yellow, set off by a chalky watermark eye around a large cream yellow throat. This stunning flower measures 6' (15cm) across the flower. It flowers in midseason and its height was registered as 28'(71cm) and it reaches that in the U.K. This unusual daylily is a tetraploid and is semi evergreen. It is a daylily that stops visitors in their tracks! It also produces a huge amount of flowers!
(from Aug '17)
Hemerocallis 'Waiting in the Wings'
A stunning purple crispate, bred by Stamile and registered in 2000. This unusual form is quite a performer with purple flowers and a yellow green throat. The slender petals and sepals reach 8" (20.5cm) making this flower quite a stunner in the border. It flowers early to mid season and is a real eye catcher when in full flower. The flowers bloom at a height of 32" (81cm). It is a Tetraploid and is also an evergreen.
(from Oct '17)
Hemerocallis 'American Revolution'
This is an older daylily bred by Wild in 1972, which is very popular for its dark flowers and is widely available. The form is of the older style daylilies with rather narrow petals of velvety, deep and dark wine red, a yellow throat and a small green heart. It is diploid and dormant, putting up fresh green leaves in spring. The scapes (flowering stems) grow to 28”(70cm) and it flowers in mid season. The dark flowers are 5.5”(13cm) across. In 2010 the American Hemerocallis Society awarded American Revolution an Honorable Mention, recognition at last.
(from Jan '18)
Hemerocallis 'April in Paris'
APRIL IN PARIS was bred by Moldovan and was introduced in 1992. The pretty cream pink flowers have a rose pink eyezone, and a yellow green throat and deep green heart. A narrow gold edge is apparent in warmer weather. The pretty blooms have been a favourite here. It is quite a prolific bloomer too! It is a tetraploid and a dormant daylily. It flowers early to midseason here and the flowers are 4.5” (11cm) and the height of the scapes is 22” (56cm).
(from Mar '18)

Hosta

Hosta 'Dinner Jacket'
As part of the BHHS's AGM Weekend, a Cut-Leaf Show was set up for members and garden visitors at RHS Harlow Carr earlier this month. As an encouragement for some interaction from those who came to see the display, people were invited to choose their favourite leaf from the 120 or so that were displayed. The outright winner was Hosta 'Dinner Jacket'. This medium-sized plant, which originates from the UK, is a sport of H. 'Halcyon', and forms a mound of attractive heart shaped leaves with a broad yellow centre surrounded by a contrasting wide variable blue-to-mid green margin which get more golden with age. In summer it produces funnel-shaped lilac flowers on tall scapes, reaching 40 cm in height. It grows best in a damp shady, or half shady, position. Hostas with similar foliage include H. 'Touch of Class' and H. 'June'.
(from Jun'17)
Hosta 'Pete's Slon-he'
(H.' Blue Monday' x H.' Heavy Duty') x H. 'Heavy Duty' Does this small possibly have the thickest leaves of any hosta in the world? Possibly. Not yet available for sale, it was registered by Piet de Rooij – best known for H. 'Pete's Dark Satellite', his first introduction, and more recently his streaked hybridizing program, in 2015. It has medium-green, near round, relatively flat leaves, but it's the thickness of the leaves that is most striking. It appears to owe this trait to H. 'Heavy Duty', an OP H. 'Electrum Stater' cross, involved in both its pod and pollen parentage, and another of Piet's introductions. According to Piet, Marco Fransen once credited H. 'Heavy Duty' as having the thickest leaf of any hosta he'd seen, but this has now been surpassed by its offspring, H.'Pete's Slon-he'. 'Slon-he' was the name given to the sedatory Chief Sitting-Bull by his own Native American People and Piet chose the name to reflect the plant's slow growth rate.
(from Oct '17)
Hosta 'Fire Island'
(H. longipes f. hypoglauca x Hosta ’Crested Surf’) By no means a new variety, but still impressive non-the-less. Registered by Bill Brinka in 1998, its bright gold, slightly wavy leaves contrast wonderfully with its deep red petioles. This red originates from its pod parent, longipes f. hypoglauca. Along with the sparsa form of H. longipes and the related species of pycnophylla (within the same section of the Giboshi subgenus), f. hypoglauca has been a great gene pool for producing red & purple petioles - H. ’Eos’, H. ’Dragon’s Eye’, H. ‘Harry van de Laar’ & H. ’Purple Boots’, to name just a few. H. ’Fire Island’ itself has produced some good sports (such as H. ‘Paradise Island’ with its green margined yellow-centered leaves). Although it doesn’t have the brightest red petioles, or red extending up into its leaves and certainly can’t match the best, most fertile breeding plant for red petioles, H. ’Fire Island’ is still a ‘must-have’ plant for me – very garden-worthy and very reasonably priced!
(from Oct '17)